Malbec Monday ~ Glama Llama 

It’s human nature to gravitate to what is new; the newest car, shoe, or smartphone. But in the world of wine, it pays to revere the old.

How old is old? This 2015 Belasco de Baquedano Llama Old Vine Malbec is about 106 years old. And old vines have plenty of tales to tell. Namely, what the condition of the soil is, how well they have been tended from year to year, how strong their roots are.

Tried and True

Celebrating their 100th birthday in 2010, these vines began with good roots: they are clones (genetically identical cuttings of mother vines, selected for particular characteristics) of  the French black Bordeaux grape. Nestled at the base of the Aconcagua Mountains, warmer days are counterbalanced by cool nights (dipping down almost as much as 45degrees F) which works to heighten the richness and complexity of the  wine’s flavor and aromatics. The grapes are given even further ‘hang time’ to develop flavors, even after sugar levels indicate that ripeness has been achieved.

While there is scant rainfall in this wine growing region, irrigation is provided in its purest form by runoff (comprised of melted snow) from nearby Andes mountains.

Age Before Beauty

Old vine grapes are generally hand harvested, which is more gentle on the vines and grapes. The higher velocity shaking of machine harvesting can be more jarring to the vines. The wine is then aged at least six momths in French oak which gives qualities of subtle toast, nuttiness and softer tannins. The final product is soft yet structured, and luxurious with rich flavors of ripe blackberry, rich plum and spice.

About the Llama

In Argentina, the llama regarded as a sure-footed, strong, support worker animal helping transport  packages and supplies through difficult terrain. Stalwart but stubborn, if you load them up too much, they will not budge. And they might even spit in your eye if you diss them.

With Age Comes

…Wisdom! But also some spectacular wine. So respect the hard working, old vine, it’s toiled through the ages to produce a wonderful bounty for you to enjoy.

Cheers! 🍷

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Malbec Monday: Random Pick

Hi there, Monday! Ok, I’m trying to be as enthusiastic as I can. I know it’s the start of the work week but since there’s no snow on the ground, and none in the near future, the week’s already off to a good start.

This week’s pick: a 2012 Alma de los Andes Reserva Malbec. Scoring 91 points from Wine Enthusiast Magazine, this clear, clean and dry offering boasts a tart blackberry vibe (experts describe this as ‘cassis‘ but I’ve never had cassis before so I’ll play it safe with the blackberry description). It has medium body, pleasant medium tannins, and its acidity was nicely balanced. While it’s jammy and fruit forward, it has a pleasurable whisper of smoke on the finish; aging for 12 months in French Oak will do that.

It retails for around $12.99, and recommended food pairings are steak with mushrooms, stews, aged cheeses and dishes featuring sun dried tomatoes.

What an awesome wine to help jump start a promising week!

Cheers!

©TheWineStudent, 2017

Just Another Malbec Monday: Fabre.Montmayou🍷

When you’re learning about wine, part of the journey is the wine lexicon: flavour/aroma characteristics, nose, palate and so on. Before my WSET Level 2 wine course begins in a few weeks,  I took a peek at the wine tasting ‘cheat sheet’ that distills the various descriptions and classifications of characteristics of wine. It’s incredibly helpful since I don’t always feel confident yet in how sophisticated my palate is, much less how I describe wine.

This week’s pick: a 2013 Fabre.Montmayou Reserva. From the first pour, I noticed a bouquet of dark cherry. The colour was clear with a ruby vibe, with a light viscosity after the swirl. Flavours were of stewed plum, liqourice, and light tobacco. Any spice I tasted became more prevalent after I paired it with a salty, light cheese. I thought I tasted cinnamon but it was savory, not sweet (the cheat sheet describes it as ‘pungent’) so I’ll go with it. 😄 It seemed to me to have medium tannin, meaning that it didn’t make my mouth feel too dry, not as dry as, say,  a Cab Sauv.

This was a very pleasurable wine that would pair well with cheese, grilled meats or poultry. Retailing for below $20, it would be a great wine to bring as your +1 to a dinner party or barbecue.

It’s been said by many a sommelier, the more you drink wine, the better your palate will become. I think in the next few months (of studying, of course!) mine should eventually earn an A+. 😉

Ah well… it’s just another Malbec Monday!

Cheers!

©TheWineStudent, 2017